Friday 28 April 2017

The conference considered the relationship between words and music in aesthetic and scientific terms, and how it affects the relationship between actor and audience then as now. Bill Barclay, Director of Music at the Globe Theatre, explored the Music of the Spheres, both as this relates to Shakespeare and its meaning from ancient times through to modern physics. Prof Michael Trimble, behavioural neurologist, examined the similarities and differences in the conception and reception of words and music, understanding their distinct and mutual importance better through the medium of Shakespeare himself.  Actors and musicians took a leading part, illustrating and responding creatively to the lectures, joining in discussion and ending the event with a performance of music and readings that reflected the themes of the day.

CLICK HERE for full programme.



Friday 16th April 2016

Friday 16th April 2016

The conference considered the relationship between words and music in aesthetic and scientific terms, and how it affects the relationship between actor and audience then as now. Bill Barclay, Director of Music at the Globe Theatre, explored the Music of the Spheres, both as this relates to Shakespeare and its meaning from ancient times through to modern physics. Prof Michael Trimble, behavioural neurologist, examined the similarities and differences in the conception and reception of words and music, understanding their distinct and mutual importance better through the medium of Shakespeare himself.  Actors and musicians took a leading part, illustrating and responding creatively to the lectures, joining in discussion and ending the event with a performance of music and readings that reflected the themes of the day.

CLICK HERE for full programme.



Friday 24th October 2014

Friday 24th October 2014

CLICK HERE to view the full programme as a PDF

Musicologists, scientists, medical professionals and performers will debate the questions: how does performing and listening to music affect the brain? Does it increase your capacity to retain information? Is there a 'Mozart effect'? Does music have the power to heal?

Speakers: Prof Jessica Grahn, Prof Jane Ginsborg, Stephen Johnson, Nigel Osborne, Prof Michael TrimbleKirsteen Davidson-Kelly and Prof Dale Hesdorffer. 

Performers: Ian Brown piano, James Gilchrist tenor, Anna Tilbrook piano

Full price: £95 / Student (full-time, available on a first come first served basis): £35


Conference programme:

Introduction  10am Ian Ritchie, Artistic Director 

Mozart’s Life and Times Stephen Johnson

Mozart and Musical Memory Prof Jessica Grahn
A scientific perspective of Mozart’s fabled memory – a general view of musical
memory and achievements of other savants.
 

Memorising Music Chaired by Prof Jessica Grahn
Kirsteen Davidson-Kelly, Prof Jane Ginsborg, with Ian Brown, James Gilchrist and Anna Tilbrook
Different strategies for memorising music, from both instrumental and vocal perspectives.
What are the key differences between ’learning’ and ‘memorising’?
        

The “Mozart Effect” Prof Jessica Grahn 

Music, Memory and Cognition Chaired by Prof Michael Trimble
Part I   Therapeutic Applications – Prof Michael Trimble with Nigel Osborne
The benefits of music in treating Dementia and other physical and mental conditions
 

Part II  Brainwaves and Sonification
Nigel Osborne with Prof Michael Trimble and Prof Dale Hesdorffer
How music may affect sleep patterns and brainwave frequencies to treat Epilepsy

Prodigy to Genius: Nature or Nurture?
Stephen Johnson with Prof Jane Ginsborg and Prof Michael Trimble
New insights into the much-debated question of how musical talent is developed.
And what do we mean by ‘prodigy’ and ‘genius’?
    

Panel discussion: all speakers, chaired by Ian Ritchie
Further reflections on the power of music, prodigy and memory

Concert  7.30pm
James Gilchrist tenor, Ian Brown piano, Anna Tilbrook piano
 

Bach Concerto for two keyboards in C (movement)
Songs by Mozart, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Bernstein, Finzi & Ravel
Mozart
Sonata in D for Two Pianos K448 

 This event had live subtitles delivered by STAGETEXT, generously supported by the National Association of Deafened People.



Friday 28th - Saturday 29th June 2013

Friday 28th - Saturday 29th June 2013

Worlds in Collision: Music and the Trauma of War

2013 Conference - Mansion House, London (Friday 28 & Saturday 29 June)

Click HERE to watch the conference on Youtube

This event had live subtitles for deaf, deafened and hard of hearing visitors, delivered by STAGETEXT, generously supported by the National Association of Deafened People

Conference brochure can be downloaded HERE.

In partnership with the

City of London Festival

In association with

The Army, Guildhall School of Music & Drama, Institute of Musical Research, Kings Centre for Military Health Research,
Scars of War Foundation, Queens College Oxford

This two-day conference brought together musicians, music therapists, arts practitioners, psychiatrists, neuroscientists, historians and soldiers to address important questions.  What is the relationship between art and war?  What have been the responses of artists to post-traumatic stress disorder? Is human creativity itself therapeutic?


Friday 28 June - The Application of Music to the Trauma of War

Old Ballroom, Mansion House.  Led by Nigel Osborne

9.00 Registration and coffee
Background music during registration and coffee provided by the four-piece
Band of the Adjutant General's Corps

10.00 Welcome (VIDEO)
The Right Hon The Lord Mayor, Roger Gifford

10.10 Music and Trauma (VIDEO)
Nigel Osborne

10.45 The AGC Band's most recent experiences working for soldiers, and civilians,
in Afghanistan (VIDEO)

Major Guy Booth and Band musicians

11.25 Coffee

11.45 Researching the cognitive neuroscience of the effects of war
Hugh McManners and Prof Morten Kringelbach

Music as a tool for improving sleep in post-traumatic stress disorder
Kira Vibe Jespersen

12.30 Song writing in Music Therapy for children (VIDEO)
Karen Diamond

How to create a song
a workshop with Nigel Osborne

1.30 Lunch

2.30 Shell Shock: How has it been viewed historically? (VIDEO)
Ben Shephard

2.55 Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
Prof Sir Simon Wessely

3.30 Music Therapy in theatres of conflict: from Northern Ireland to Bosnia and beyond (VIDEO)
Dr Julie Sutton and Lord John Alderdice

4.25 Tea

4.45 Music Therapy and the treatment of trauma related to conflict (VIDEO)
Ann Sloboda

5.30 Is Creativity Therapeutic? Panel discussion (VIDEO)
Chaired by Nigel Osborne, with Lord Alderdice, Prof John Sloboda, Major Guy Booth, Prof Morten Kringelbach, Hugh McManners
and Major Guy Booth

6.00 Conference day ends

6.30-8 Experiential Music Therapy workshop at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama
Ann Sloboda


Saturday 29 June - The Response of Music to the Experience of War

Old Ballroom / Egyptian Hall, Mansion House.  Led by Stephen Johnson

10.00 Registration and coffee

10.45 Introduction (VIDEO)
Ian Ritchie, Artistic Director

10.55 Music Written in Response to War: from Bach to Shostakovich (VIDEO)
Stephen Johnson

11.45 How Music and Art have been used to Propagate War (VIDEO)
Alberto Portugheis

12.10 Music that Changed Sides (VIDEO)
Patrick Bade

12.45 Lunch

2.00 Military Music in Operational Theatres
Lt Col Bob Meldrum

2.45 Artistic responses to conflict (VIDEO)
Jemima Montagu, Lis Murphy, Emmanuela Yogolelo

3.55 War poetry and settings of war poems (VIDEO)
Stephen Johnson with Adrian Thompson, tenor and Anna Tilbrook, piano

4.35 Tea


Saturday 29 June 5.15pm

5.15 Pre-concert talk (Egyptian Hall) with Stephen Johnson and Nigel Osborne, chaired by Ian Ritchie

5.40 Pre-concert performance (Salon)

Brass Quintet of The Royal Artillery Band

Vaughan Williams Sea Songs

6.00 Concert (Egyptian Hall)

The Royal Artillery Band
Adrian Thompson, tenor
Captain Craig Hallatt, Director of Music

R. Strauss Festmusik der Stadt Wien
Philip Sparke Overture to a Great City
Butterworth Songs from A Shropshire Lad:
(arr Nigel Osborne) Loveliest of Trees - The Lads in their hundreds
Gurney Songs from the trenches:
(arr Nigel Osborne) In Flanders - Severn Meadows - Bierside - Such is Time
Grainger Irish Tune from County Derry
Osborne Medley of music by soldier-composers:
Bliss Dawn on the Somme - Butterworth The Banks of Green Willow -
Coles Sorrowful Dance - Farrar Lullaby - Gurney Prelude in F sharp -
Wallace Cradle Song - Vaughan Williams Seventeen Come Sunday

Interval (10 minutes)

Rob Wiffin Royal Gunners
Karl Jenkins Benedictus from The Armed Man
Various Suite of solos:
Bach Badinerie (tuba) - Lalo Andantino (violin) - Koenig Posthorn
Gallop (posthorns)

Coles Cortege from Behind the Lines
Walton Crown Imperial




Saturday 27th - Sunday 28th October 2012

Saturday 27th - Sunday 28th October 2012

The Beethoven Question: Can Art Make Life Worth Living?

Saturday 27th and Sunday 28th October

Purcell Room, Southbank Centre

Click HERE for full programme.

Saturday 27th October - DAY ONE

10.00 Introduction – Stephen Johnson

10.15 Beethoven’s life and deafness - John Suchet  

Followed by discussion with Stephen Johnson and questions

Coffee

11.15 Beethoven’s deafness, his string quartets and his three styles – 
Prof Age Smilde, and Dr Edoardo Saccenti, of Biosystems Data Analysis at the Swammerdam
Institute for Life Sciences at the University of Amsterdam: with the Sacconi Quartet 

Followed by discussion and questions – with the Sacconi Quartet and Stephen Johnson

12.15 Coffee

12.30 Lost and Sound: a moving creative documentary made by a partially deaf filmmaker, Lindsey Dryden.
It weaves its way through the startling world of sound and silence of: a dancer deaf since birth,
a young pianist who lost her hearing as a baby, and a music critic facing sudden partial
hearing loss.  Featuring: Dr David Eagleman, Philip Ball, Professor Nigel Osborne, Dr Katie
Overy, Professor David Huron, Dr Robert Zatorre.

1.30 Lunch (not provided)

2.40 Music and Deafness:
Introduced by Prof Michael Trimble

Music and its Impact on the Deaf

Dr Paul Whittaker OBE, Artistic Director of Music and the Deaf

The role of art in coping with sensory impairment 
Robert Fulford, Centre for Music Performance Research, Royal Northern College of Music 
Effects of Hearing Impairment on Music Making
Joined by Nigel Osborne, composer, co-director of the Institute for Music in Human and Social 
Development, and Lloyd Colemancomposer

Discussion with Michael Trimble, Paul Whittaker, Robert Fulford, Nigel Osborne and Lloyd Coleman         


     

4.50 Tea

Panel discussion: The Need to Compose
Introduced by Nigel Osborne with Stephen Johnson, Barry Cooper and Lloyd Coleman

5.45 Pre-concert break

6.45 Concert – The Sacconi Quartet

Introduction by Ian Ritchie and Stephen Johnson

  Beethoven String Quartet Op.18 No.4 in C minor (1800)
Lloyd Coleman String Quartet (2009)
Interval
Beethoven String Quartet Op. 132 in A minor (1825)


Sunday 28th October - DAY TWO

We regret to announce that the audio of day two was not recorded due to circumstances beyond our control. Written transcripts are currently being prepared and will be available shortly. We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

10.00 Summary – Stephen Johnson

Beethoven's Piano Sonatas – Prof Barry Cooper

Discussion and questions - with Stephen Johnson and Ian Brown

Coffee

11.15 Coffee Concert
Piano Recital, Ian Brown

Beethoven  WoO 47 No. 2 in F minor
Beethoven Sonata Op.110

12.00 Panel discussion: The Need to Perform –
Ian Brown with Stephen Johnson, Prof Barry Cooper, and members of the
  Sacconi Quartet

Lunch (not provided)

2.15 Beethoven: Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know - Prof Michael Trimble

3.00 Beethoven and Words

Beethoven's Approach to Word Settings and Folksong arrangements - Prof Barry Cooper

Beethoven: Father of the Lied - Prof Richard Stokes with Stephan Loges and Anna Tilbrook

Discussion and questions with Stephen Johnson, Barry Cooper, Richard Stokes and Stephan Loges

Tea

4.30 Panel discussion: The Need to Listen - music in the face of human problems

with Michael Pugh, Stephen Johnson, Prof Michael Trimble, and Lloyd Coleman

5.00 Open discussion: Can Art make life worth living?   Have we answered the question?

with Ian Ritchie, Stephen Johnson, Prof Michael Trimble, Prof Richard Stokes and Prof Barry Cooper

5.45 Pre-concert break

6.45 Concert – Sacconi Quartet, Stephan Loges, baritone and Anna Tilbrook, piano

Signed by Dr Paul Whittaker OBE

Introduction by Ian Ritchie and Stephen Johnson

Beethoven  String Quartet Op. 59  no 3 in C major, Razumovsky (1808)
Beethoven Folksong arrangements (1813 – 1818) – baritone and piano trio:
The Soldier
Faithfu' Johnie
The Pulse of an Irishman

Interval
Beethoven An die ferne Geliebte Op.98 (1816) – baritone and piano
Beethoven String Quartet Op. 135 (1826)  in F major (1826)




Friday 7th October 2011

Friday 7th October 2011

Why Music?  Is Music Different from the Other Arts?

Click HERE for the full programme.

Introduction - Professor Michael Trimble

There have been debates going back for over 2,000 years about the similarities and differences between art forms, and several writers at various times have venerated music as superior to the rest. This symposium will explore these views from a multidisciplinary perspective, from the philosophical to the therapeutic, and from the psychological to the neurological. The relevance of the latter, especially as revealed to us with modern brain imaging, will be the subject of discussion, questioning the current role of neuroscience for philosophy and aesthetics. Click here to download the transcript as a PDF document

Can there be a Science of Musical Understanding? - Professor Roger Scruton

We speak of understanding and misunderstanding music; music is a form of communication; and the habit of sitting still and listening while music plays is one that demands an explanation, especially at a time when hardly anyone does it. What form should such an explanation take, and is neuroscience likely to have a part in shaping it? And what bearing would the explanation have on our understanding of other art forms? Click here to download the transcript as a PDF document

The Neurohistory of Art: How Neuroscience Illuminates Individual Inspiration - Professor John Onians  

Neuroaesthetics tends to look to neuroscience for help in the study of universals, such as beauty. Neurohistory uses neuroscience to help to explain those behaviours of individuals and groups that are exceptional, from the creativity of particular artists and musicians to the responsiveness of particular viewers and listeners. The talk suggests ways in which brain scanners and electron microscopes offer insights into the most mysterious activities of the human mind. It also argues that in doing so, far from reducing the mind’s mystery, they greatly enhance it. Click here to download the transcript as a PDF document

What Classical Musicians Can Learn from Other Arts on How to Build Audiences - Professor John Sloboda and Dr Biranda Ford  

There has been a well-documented decline in attendance at classical music concerts at the same time as audiences for other art-forms (e.g. visual art) have never been healthier. This lecture reviews some of the psychological factors that impact on audiences when experiencing music and other art forms, and outlines some recent initiatives, which encourage musicians to build a stronger relationship to audiences by learning from other arts, particularly drama. Click here to download the transcript as a PDF document

The Purpose of Art and the Role of Music in Therapy - Professor Ray Tallis and Professor Nigel Osborne 

Art, like human consciousness, is gloriously useless. It has no biological function but rather is an attempt to come to terms with, even to heal, the wound in the present tense, which is in part the result of the fact that ideas and experience, content and form are in conflict. It is an expression of the unique freedom of human beings to make their own sense of the world. The therapeutic implications of this for those who have been damaged by life or by illness are both self-evident and ambivalent. Click here to download the transcript as a PDF document

Can Music Portray Happiness and Sadness? - Stephen Johnson with Ian Ritchie, Ian Brown and the Sacconi Quartet

Please note, musical illustrations in this session were performed live, not under professional recording conditions and using an electric piano. Click here to download the transcript as a PDF document

Debate and Open Forum: Neuroimaging is Important to our Understanding of Aesthetics and our Responses to Art - Professors: Michael Trimble, Roger Scruton, John Onians, John Sloboda, Ray Tallis and Nigel Osborne Click here to download the transcript as a PDF document

2011 Conference Questionnaire
Download the questionnaire here



Saturday 2nd - Sunday 3rd October 2010

Saturday 2nd - Sunday 3rd October 2010

Robert Schumann: The Man, the Mind, the Music

St John's Smith Square, London

Why does music have such powerful effects upon us, our moods and well-being? How can music help to heal trauma, illness and brain injury? Professor Nigel Osborne, composer and pioneer in music therapy, and Stephen Johnson, writer and BBC Radio 3 presenter, introduced lectures by neuroscientists and psychiatrists and led discussions, illustrated by concerts featuring the music of Robert Schumann (1810-1856) and composers who influenced or were influenced by him.

CLICK HERE for full programme.



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